Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Forester kangaroo (Macropus giganteus), at Springlawn Narawntapu National Park.
Forester kangaroo, Narawntapu National Park.

Land mammals

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Alerts for Land mammals

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


​​Tasmania is home to many unique and unusual mammals. Here you can find out more information about them, their scientific names, and the best places to see them.

In this Topic

  • Bats
    Tasmania's bats are small but widespread, keep an eye out for one of our eight species.
  • Kangaroos and wallabies
    Learn more about these instantly-recognised Australian animals.
  • Platypus and echidnas
    Two of our most unusual native creatures, find out more about these wonderful monotremes.
  • Possums
    Tasmania is home to five species of possums, find out more about these night-time adventurers.
  • Quolls
    This largely nocturnal animal can be hard to find, find out the best places to catch a glimpse of these carnivorous mammals.
  • Wombats
    Find out more about one of our most endearing mammals, the wombat.

​​Tasmania has a unique assemblage of Australian animals, including the three largest extant (living) marsupial predators - Tasmanian devil, spotted-tailed quoll and eastern quoll. Because of its island status, fewer introduced predators and a relatively large amount of intact habitat, Tasmania has a diverse mammal fauna and the state is a stronghold for many species which have become extinct, or are on the verge of extinction, on mainland Australia.

Tasmania has several endemic mammilian species - those found nowhere else in the world. Some, like the Tasmanian devil and Tasmanian tiger​ are well-known. Others, such as the eastern quoll, pademelon, long-tailed mouse and bettong are less well-known, but equally fascinating.

Like most of Australia's mammals, the Tasmanian mammal fauna comprises many marsupials, or pouched mammals. Marsupials are remarkable for their method of reproduction; they produce fingernail-sized young that complete their development in their mother's pouch.

For further information, the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment ​​(DPIPWE) has a complete list of Tasmania's land mammals.​