Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).
Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus). (photograph: Dave Watts)

Platypus and echidnas

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Alerts for Platypus and echidnas

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


​​Platypus and echidnas  are classified as monotremes; monotremes have lower body temperatures than other mammals and have short legs which extend out.  These features, together with their egg-laying, are more like that of a lizard than a mammal. 

Pla​​typus

Scientific name - Ornithorhynchus anatinus

The platypus was thought to be a joke by the first scienists to examine their body in 1799.  They are one of the only egg-laying, semi-aquatic mammals in the world.  They have webbed feet, a broad tail like a beaver and a characteristic duck-like bill. Closing their eyes and ears when they dive underwater, like a dolphin, electrolocation through their bill is used to find food.  This means sometimes they end up on the end of fishing lines, unable to see the danger. 

Echidna​​

Scientific name - Tachyglossus aculeatus​

E​​​chidnas feast on ants and termintes and protect themselves with spines, which can reach 5cm long.  Solitary for most of the year, until mating time when several males may follow a single female. Taking shelter in rotten logs, stumps, burrows, or under bushes, echidnas go into to a type of hibernation over winter. Surprisingly, echidnas are good swimmers, paddling about with only their snout and a few spines showing above the water. They have even been known to swim amongst the waves in the ocean! 

​Where can you see both of them?​