Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Lesser long-eared bat (Nyctophilus geoffroyi) clinging to a tree in daylight.
Lesser long-eared bat (Nyctophilus geoffroyi) (photograph: Simon Grove)

Bats

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Alerts for Bats

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


​Living inside the hollows and deep crevices of the trunks of our tallest and oldest eucalypts are our smallest bats – in fact some of Australia’s smallest mammals; micro bats. Space permitting, up to 50 of them may share the same tree hollow.  

Tasmania boasts eight different species of bats, one of which is only found here and no where else in the world.  They can be seen flying between the trees just after dusk, like big moths, zipping around feasting on insects.

Scientific names​​

  • ​Little forest bat - Vespadelus vulturnus
  • Southern forest bat - Vespadelus regulus
  • Large forest bat - Vespadelus darlingtoni
  • Chocolate wattled bat - Chalinolobus morio
  • Goulds wattled bat - Chalinolobus gouldii
  • Lesser long-eared bat - Nyctophilus geoffroyi
  • Tasmanian long-eared bat - Nyctophilus sherrini
  • Eastern false pipistrelle - Falsistrellus tasmaniensis

Where can I see them?​

Bats are widespread in Tasmania, particularly near forests.