Critical Alert 

Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
From 25/6/2020, last reviewed 3/7/2020

​​​Most Parks and Wildlife Service facilities have reopened to the public following the closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Visitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may still be in place. ​


Wombat (Vombatus ursinus) grazing on Maria Island National Park.
Wombat (Vombatus ursinus) grazing on Maria Island National Park. (photograph: Why Then How)

Wombats

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Alerts for Wombats

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see details
Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
From 25/6/2020, last reviewed 3/7/2020

​​​Most Parks and Wildlife Service facilities have reopened to the public following the closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Visitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may still be in place. ​


Wombats​​

​Scientific name - ​Vombatus ursinus

The common wombat is the largest burrowing herbivorous mammal. Indeed, it is such an accomplished burrower that early settlers called it a 'badger', a term that is still heard today. However, the closest relative of the wombat is, in fact, the koala. With its short tail and legs, characteristic waddle and 'cuddly' appearance, the wombat is one of the most endearing of Australia's native animals. 

Where can I see it?​​​