Our Latest News

Easter safety is paramount for our parks and reserves

18/04/2019

The Parks and Wildlife Service encourages visitors and Tasmanians alike to get outdoors and get active - especially in our parks and reserves.More

Good news, Hartz Mountain National Park and other tracks are open!

17/04/2019

In time for Easter walking, PWS have been able to re-open a number of tracks.More

New Mt Mawson Shelter officially opened ahead of ski season

29/03/2019

The new Mt Mawson Public Shelter was today officially opened and will provide a new level of amenity for southern Tasmania's only ski field, as well as upgraded facilities for bushwalkers heading to the iconic Tarn Shelf walk in Mt Field National Park.More

Maria Island National Park

Macropod Management

From the late 1960s a number of native animals were introduced to Maria Island to enhance the nature reserve experience  for visitors. The resident populations of Tasmanian pademelons and Bennett’s wallabies were increased and Forester kangaroos suffering habitat loss on the Tasmanian mainland were relocated to the island as a conservation measure.  All adapted well to their new environment. Managing the macropod populations on Maria Island is a challenge as they have no natural predators and their populations increase significantly when pasture is plentiful.

The Parks and Wildlife Service's objective in managing the macropod populations on Maria Island is to conserve the island’s natural systems and biodiversity while also ensuring a viable, healthy animal population. 

This is based on scientific monitoring of three main indicators: the condition of the island’s pastures; the population and health of the three macropod species (Forester kangaroos, Bennett’s wallaby and Tasmanian pademelon); current and predicted rainfall and therefore available food; and the predicted rate of population increase.

Further information is available in these documents:

 

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