Our Latest News

Lookout at Bruny Island Neck reopens

12/11/2018

Bruny Island is one of Tasmania's most loved tourism destinations, and the upgrade of vital infrastructure will ensure it can reach its full tourism potential.More

History unlocked at Richmond Gaol

12/11/2018

Investment in the restoration of the Gaoler's House at Richmond Gaol will enhance the visitor experience at one of Tasmania's key historic sites.More

Campfire restrictions in national parks and reserves

09/11/2018

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from next Wednesday (November 14) at identified Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Mt Direction Historic Site

Introduction

Mount Direction - the semaphore station at Launceston in 1844
The Mount Direction Semaphore Station was one of a number of stations set up in the Tamar Valley during the mid-nineteenth century. It provided a central link between the other stations which allowed communication to stretch from Launceston to George Town.  The Tamar Valley system is one of the earliest in Australia.

The Mount Direction site is particularly important as it is one of the only examples remaining; other stations in the Tamar system have been demolished or built over.  Mount Direction is the only site which still has its major parts in place, such as the old residence, out-buildings and walls.

Mount Direction Historic Site is important as an example of the communications system used in British military colonies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  It was used for both government and maritime functions.  It is different from similar stations in southern Tasmania (such as Tasman peninsula) because of its well-built nearby house.