Our Latest News

Seasonal campfire restrictions commence in national parks and reserves

25/09/2019

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from Saturday 28th September at identified Parks and Wildlife Service campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

Information on Tasmania's buttongrass moorlands now online

30/09/2004

A distinctive feature of western Tasmania, buttongrass moorlands harbour a rich diversity of plant species and provide important habitat for many animals. Buttongrass moorlands occupy some of the most nutrient poor situations to be found in the world and are one of the most fire-adapted ecosystems to have evolved.

In Tasmania buttongrass moorlands occupy more than one million hectares, approximately one seventh of the island. Learn more about this distinctive plant community at our new web page on buttongrass moorlands.

The soils in coastal areas are usually deficient in major nutrients, high in salt spray and generally lacking in water, and consequently are very harsh environments for plants to grow in. Many plants have adapted and flourish in the harsh coastal environment. Discover Tasmania's coastal vegetation at our new web page.