Our Latest News

Seasonal campfire restrictions commence in national parks and reserves

25/09/2019

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from Saturday 28th September at identified Parks and Wildlife Service campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Fly Neighbourly Advice for the Tasman National Park

24/08/2019

Public comment is invited on the draft Tasman National Park Fly Neighbourly Advice. The draft Fly Neighbourly Advice has been prepared by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service in response to increasing air traffic over the Tasman National Park.More

Hybrid diesel-electric shuttle buses at Cradle Mountain - a first for National p

19/08/2019

When you next visit Cradle Mountain you will be able to step aboard one of the new hybrid, diesel-electric, shuttle buses on your trip to Dove Lake. These new buses will reduce emissions and deliver a quieter, all mobility friendly, visitor experience.More

Kings Lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica

King's lomatia - the Oldest Plant Clone in the World?

Kings Holly

Recent research on an endangered species of Tasmanian plant has led to the discovery of what is thought to be the oldest known plant clone on Earth. Stands of genetically identical individuals of Lomatia tasmanica, or King's lomatia, have been estimated to be at least 43 000 years old.

King's lomatia, Lomatia tasmanica, is a highly endangered species of the family Proteaceae, found only in two tiny localities in the remote south-west of Tasmania. The total population comprises approximately 500 plants. The populations appear to be maintained vegetatively, by root suckering and coppice. One stand has spread over 1.2km, the second longest such clone in the world after the 2km long huckleberry (Gaylussacia brachycerium) clone in North America.Full details of the species is available on the Department of Primary Industries and Water's web site.