Our Latest News

Sustainable Timber Tasmania and Parks and Wildlife Service announce road opening

21/05/2019

Florentine Road and Arve Road (to the Hartz Mountain junction) are officially reopened to the public.More

Easter safety is paramount for our parks and reserves

18/04/2019

The Parks and Wildlife Service encourages visitors and Tasmanians alike to get outdoors and get active - especially in our parks and reserves.More

Good news, Hartz Mountain National Park and other tracks are open!

17/04/2019

In time for Easter walking, PWS have been able to re-open a number of tracks.More

PWS Fire Update - Thursday 31 January 2019

31/01/2019

The majority of Tasmania’s national parks remain open for business.


Of the 19 national parks in Tasmania, most remain open and are well serviced with high visitation. Cradle Mountain, Maria Island, Bruny Island and the majority of Flinders Island are open and running at good capacity. We urge people to continue to enjoy parks in areas where it is safe to do so. 


The following areas are now re-opened:


Tasman National Park


Cashs Lookout Track 


Waterfall Bluff Track 


Clemes Peak Track 


Tasman Arch to Waterfall Bay Track 


Waterfall Bay to Fortescue Bay Track 


Tatnells Hill from Balts Road Track 


Tatnells Hill side track 


Lichen Hill Track 


Arthurs Peak hang-gliding launch access


Devils Kitchen 


Blowhole Circuit Track 


Tasman Arch Circuit Track


Freycinet National Park  


Douglas Apsley National Park – Apsley Waterhole Day Use Area has re-opened today, but Apsley Gorge and Leeaberra Track remain closed.


Planned re-opening:


Maria Island National Park 


Mt Maria track and Frenchs Farm Inland route will re-open tomorrow, Friday 1 February 2019 


Mt Field National Park remains closed today (Thursday 31 January) and will also be closed tomorrow (Friday 1 February 2019) 


PWS will re-evaluate the situation in the afternoon tomorrow and will advise in due course. 


Junee Cave State Reserve and Marriott Falls State Reserve are also closed until further notice. 


Cooler conditions today have allowed PWS staff to plan and implement protection plans for reserve values.


PWS staff are taking steps to protect historic heritage by wrapping a number of historic huts in sisalation wrap to reduce the likelihood of them burning down. This is a foil-like material designed to protect homes and buildings against radiant heat.


This action follows the loss of the historic Churchill’s Hut earlier this week.


These measures won’t stop a head fire from destroying the huts, but will reduce the likelihood of damage from an ember attack or radiant heat from a nearby fire.


Huts that have been wrapped so far include Government huts and the Twilight Tarn hut at Mt Field. There are also plans to wrap the Lake Fenton hut and Lake Belcher hut in the Mt Field area, along with historic huts in the Walls of Jerusalem National Park if conditions permit.


PWS has also established sprinkler lines around sensitive vegetation at Lake Rhona and Mt Anne and conducted retardant drops to slow down fire runs. 


Protection efforts have been successful at the top of Mount Anne and Mt Bobs with fire moving through button grass but reducing once it reaches wet vegetation.


Protection of life and property is always the priority but our natural values are also of a high priority and we put every effort into protecting those where we can.


People planning on visiting parks are asked to check the PWS closures website. With current weather conditions, the situation remains fluid and can change quickly so we ask the public to stay informed.


For a complete list of track, area and campground closures please visit: www.parks.tas.gov.au/closures


With the large number of fires burning and the potential for spotting and new starts due to the weather forecast, PWS are asking people NOT to venture into remote areas.


PWS would like to remind everyone that campfire restrictions are still in place across all national parks, reserves and Crown Land state-wide until further notice. Parks staff will be conducting patrols to ensure that they are being adhered to.


As fires under hot, dry and windy conditions can travel very fast, it’s important for visitors to stay informed in case conditions change. 


 What to do



  • stay informed in case conditions change;

  • check in at visitor centres for the latest information,

  • heed advice at track heads,

  • follow directions of PWS staff at national parks and reserves; and

  • monitor the following websites:


www.parks.tas.gov.au/closures 


www.fire.tas.gov.au 


www.police.tas.gov.au/community-alerts/ 


www.alert.tas.gov.au 



  • listen to ABC local radio