Our Latest News

Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) experienced significant wildfire events between the months of January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area’s Outstanding Universal Values.


The planned burn program remains a top priority for Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS).  The program is funded by the TWWHA’s Burn Mitigation and Fuel Reduction budget of $500,000 per year, which has been in place since 2017.


Specialist staff from PWS recently conducted successful planned burns at Pelion Plains on the Overland Track inside the Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park and at Melaleuca Inlet in the Southwest National Park. 


The burn area at Pelion Plains near New Pelion Hut targeted a 150ha block.


The purpose of the burn was to maintain the biodiversity of a fire-adapted ecosystem, and to protect built assets at Pelion Plains in the event of a wildfire.


Buttongrass communities, such as those on Pelion Plains, require periodic burning. Fire is an important tool for maintaining a healthy and diverse ecosystem.


Without fire, the Pelion plains would become scrubby, eventually losing the buttongrass tussocks; that house many unique plant and animal species, such as the peat burrowing crayfish, ground parrots and primitive plants such as club mosses.


The Melaleuca Inlet Burn was 453ha in size, the purpose of the planned burn was to enhance the Orange Bellied Parrot (OBP) foraging habitat for future breeding seasons. Thereby increasing the amount and diversity of the Orange Bellied Parrots preferred vegetation.  It also aimed to protect conservation values and built assets. 


Whilst the planned burns are just two of a number the PWS has undertaken around the state this autumn, their significance is that the iconic Overland Track is the first burn conducted on the track for many years and the other will contribute greatly towards the recovery efforts for the Orange Bellied Parrot.



The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) experienced significant wildfire events between the months of January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area’s Outstanding Universal Values.


The planned burn program remains a top priority for Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS).  The program is funded by the TWWHA’s Burn Mitigation and Fuel Reduction budget of $500,000 per year, which has been in place since 2017.


Specialist staff from PWS recently conducted successful planned burns at Pelion Plains on the Overland Track inside the Cradle Mountain - Lake St Clair National Park and at Melaleuca Inlet in the Southwest National Park.  


The burn area at Pelion Plains near New Pelion Hut targeted a 150ha block.


The purpose of the burn was to maintain the biodiversity of a fire-adapted ecosystem, and to protect built assets at Pelion Plains in the event of a wildfire.


Buttongrass communities, such as those on Pelion Plains, require periodic burning. Fire is an important tool for maintaining a healthy and diverse ecosystem.


Without fire, the Pelion plains would become scrubby, eventually losing the buttongrass tussocks; that house many unique plant and animal species, such as the peat burrowing crayfish, ground parrots and primitive plants such as club mosses.


The Melaleuca Inlet Burn was 453ha in size, the purpose of the planned burn was to enhance the Orange Bellied Parrot (OBP) foraging habitat for future breeding seasons. Thereby increasing the amount and diversity of the Orange Bellied Parrots preferred vegetation.  It also aimed to protect conservation values and built assets. 


Whilst the planned burns are just two of a number the PWS has undertaken around the state this autumn, their significance is that the iconic Overland Track is the first burn conducted on the track for many years and the other will contribute greatly towards the recovery efforts for the Orange Bellied Parrot.