Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Penguins at Macqaurie Island
Penguins at Macqaurie Island
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Macquarie Island World Heritage Area

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Alerts for Macquarie Island World Heritage Area

See details

see details
Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


About

​Subantarctic Macquarie Island is as remote as it is awe-inspiring, roughly located halfway between Tasmania and Antarctica​. This island of lush green vegetation is geographically closer to New Zealand than it is Australia and is subject to the full force of the Southern Ocean.

Macquarie Island is far enough south that access by humans is limited, and far enough north to allow sub-Antarctic species to thrive. Described as a wonder spot of the world, by Sir Douglas Mawson. T​he island is an important site for a proliferation of wildlife, including extensive seal colonies and an array of penguin species. Around 3.5 million seabirds and 80,000 elephant seals arrive on Macquarie Island each year to breed and moult.

Macquarie Island is a site of outstanding geological and natural significance and was awarded World Heritage status in 1997, forming a second Tasmanian World Heritage Area.

More information on Tasmanian World Heritage areas can be found on our World Heritage Area ​page. 

Further information on the Macquarie Island research station can be found on the Australian Antarctic Division website.


 

Macquarie Island is a geological wonder. The rocks hidden under its tussocks and peat were formed on or deep below the seabed. This makes the island unique and the main reason for its listing as a site of World Heritage significance. 

Rock outcrops on the northern part of the island have been pushed up from about 6 km below the ocean floor, producing a unique exposure of rocks from the upper mantle. No drill hole has ever penetrated these depths and these exposures provide a rare opportunity for geologists to gain an understanding of such rocks. The southern part of Macquarie Island is composed of rocks formed by lava erupting from long fissures across the ocean floor. Mid-oceanic ridges like these are exposed in very few places, such as Macquarie Island and Iceland. 

Small earth tremors frequently shake Macquarie Island and larger quakes measuring 6.2 or higher on the Richter scale average one a year. 

Introduced Pests and the Macquarie Island Pest Eradication Project

Macquarie Island has a long history of battling the impacts of introduced pests.

The weka, or Maori hen, was brought to Macquarie Island in 1867 from New Zealand as a source of food. The weka put pressure on the native Macquarie Island parakeet and rail, and the species became extinct on the island. Weka numbers declined in the 1980s and the last weka was dispatched in 1988.

Feral cats were recorded as early as 1820. Colonies of ground and burrow-nest birds were easy prey for the proficient hunters and large numbers of them were destroyed within a few decades. Cat control measures were implemented in 1974, but it wasn't until the late 1990s that the focus shifted to complete eradication. Between 1998 and 2002 the intensive shooting and trapping program was successful in eradicating feral cats.

Rabbits were brought to the island in the late 1870s as a food source for the oiling crews working on the island. They eventually colonised the steep, soft-soiled hillsides and the plateau regions and the impacts of rabbit grazing on vegetation and soil stability became severe.

After several years of detailed planning, in 2007 funding was provided to implement an eradication plan that would simultaneously target mice, ship rats and rabbits. The project involved an extensive phase of aerial baiting, which was completed in July 2011. The last rabbit was recorded on the island in November 2011, and after three years of intensive patrolling with by hunting teams and their dogs, the project was declared a success in 2014.

With the removal of rabbits and the resulting intensive grazing pressure, the island's vegetation is rapidly rebounding. Sea birds, which had suffered predation of eggs and chicks by rats, are also returning in numerous areas. Invertebrates too, are recovering.

Macquarie Island Nature Reserve - Marine area

The Macquarie Island Nature Reserve also occupies all of Macquarie Island's State waters from 0-3 nautical miles outward, and is about 75,000 ha in size.

The island and surrounding area are unique in their geological characteristics. It is the only known location where oceanic crust, from a normal mid-ocean ridge, has been lifted above sea level in a major oceanic basin. Moreover, its overall north-south trend means that it acts as a major barrier to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the earth's largest and most important oceanic current, which flows eastward about the Antarctic landmass. This impacts on the balance of oceanic and atmospheric heat and chemical exchange, which in turn has an effect on the southern hemisphere's weather patterns. 

  
  
  
  
2020-2021 Macquarie Island Commercial Educational Tourist Visits Criteria.pdf
  
3/04/2020 10:46 AMBurdon, Jenni
2020-21 Macquarie Island Educational Tourist Visit Guidelines.pdf
  
3/04/2020 10:45 AMBurdon, Jenni
APCA Rec Driving Guide.pdf
  
9/12/2019 2:28 PMBrumby, Eric
Appendix A - Natural Values Assessment.pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:12 AMBrumby, Eric
Appendix A Wineglass Bay Lookout Visual Impact Assessment.pdf
  
27/03/2020 6:11 PMSystem Account
Appendix B - Walking Track Alignment and Redevelopment Report.pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:13 AMBrumby, Eric
Appendix B Wineglass Bay Lookout Aboriginal Heritage Desktop Review.pdf
  
27/03/2020 4:20 PMSystem Account
Appendix C - Onsite Wastewater Assessment (Dixons Kingdom).pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:13 AMBrumby, Eric
Appendix C Wineglass Bay Lookout Ecological Assessment.pdf
  
27/03/2020 4:19 PMSystem Account
Appendix D - Onsite Wastewater Assessment (Lake Adelaide).pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:13 AMBrumby, Eric
Appendix E - Concept Designs (Dixons Kingdom).pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:13 AMBrumby, Eric
Appendix F - Concept Designs Wild Dog Creek.pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:13 AMBrumby, Eric
Appendix G – TWWHA Management Plan Additional Assessment Criteria.pdf
  
20/01/2020 9:13 AMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Cancel_Crown_Agreement.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Lease_Crown_land.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Licence_Crown_land.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Purchase_Crown_land_-_general.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Purchase_Crown_land_-_reserved_road_or_minor_adhesion.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Renew_Crown_land_lease.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Renew_Crown_land_licence.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_transfer_Crown_land_agreement.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Application_to_Vary_Crown_Agreement.pdf
  
21/10/2019 4:40 PMBrumby, Eric
Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area Management Plan 2002.pdf
  
20/08/2019 1:45 PMBrumby, Eric
Australia Day Weekend -Special Discovery Events.pdf
  
23/01/2020 12:02 PMSystem Account
bassstraitpdf.pdf
  
20/08/2019 1:45 PMBrumby, Eric
Bay of Fires 5-26 January.pdf
  
17/01/2020 2:26 PMSystem Account
Ben Lomond Management Plan 1998.pdf
  
20/08/2019 1:46 PMBrumby, Eric
Ben Lomond NP Closure 2.pdf
  
31/01/2020 6:00 PMSystem Account
BOF Jan 22 to Jan 30.pdf
  
17/01/2020 5:47 PMSystem Account
Bruny Island - 22nd Jan to 28th Jan.pdf
  
17/01/2020 6:53 PMBrumby, Eric
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