Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Low Head Lighthouse, overlooking ocean with cloudy skies
Low Head Lighthouse

Low Head Historic Site

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Alerts for Low Head Historic Site

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


About

​A village of distinctive red and white convict built cottages nestles at the striking kanamaluka/River Tamar estuary, north of George Town, Tasmania. Stroll the lawns and admire the Low Head Pilot Station. Continue on to the Low Head Light Station, majestically perched on a rocky outcrop overlooking Bass Strait.

This maritime precinct has been fundamental to Australia’s history; Batman and Faulkner sailed past Low Head, Tasmania, on their way to found Melbourne in 1835. The port dates back to 1805 with the Pilot Station running since then.  The Light Station has been running continuously since 1833.

The museum has a collection of artefacts that reflect the era of sail and steam vessels. The accompanying tales of pilots, shipwrecks, explorers, lighthouse keepers and captains that forged their names into Australia’s maritime history will give you a sense of the characters that shaped Tasmania. If you visit the Light Station at noon on a Sunday you will be treated to the sound of the only operating foghorn in the Southern Hemisphere.

​​Low Head Pilot Station Maritime Museum

Located in the historic Pilot's Row,  the museum is managed by a local volunteer group, the Low Head Pilot Station Support Group Inc. Encompassing Pilot's Row, the Storage Sheds, Boat Shed and associated artefacts, the museum is open daily and operates tours for visitors.  For more information, see the Museum website​

Accommodation and cafe

Those wishing to stay in the area can take advantage of the Low Head Historic Precinct's newly renovated self-contained cottages.  These historic buildings are situated around the Village Green at the Pilot Station and include the keeper's cottage, schoolhouse and pilot's cottage. There is also accommodation at the Light Station.​

​Overlooking the beach, the River Tamar ​and the Low Head Precincts, the Coxswain's Cottage Café is open daily and is a wonderful setting for a relaxing meal and glass of wine.

Further information can be found on the Low Head Precinct's website​.