Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Overland Track walker practicing leave no trace principles by walking through, not around, a mud hole on the track.
Overland Track walker practicing leave no trace principles (photograph: Heath Holden)

Leave No Trace

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Alerts for Leave No Trace

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


​​​​The seven principles​​ of Leave No Trace build awareness, appreciation and respect for our natural and cultural heritage.​

1. Plan ahea​d and prepare

  • Know the regulations and special concerns of the area you will visit
  • Schedule your trip to avoid times of high use
  • Walk in small groups. Split larger parties into groups of 4-6
  • Repackage food to minimise waste
  • Take maps and a compass or a GPS, and know how to use them to eliminate the use of flagging tape or rock cairns

​2. Walk and cam​p on durable surfaces

  • Durable camping surfaces include established campsites, tent platforms, rock, gravel and sand
  • Good campsites are found, not made. Altering a site is not necessary. If you use rocks to secure tents, return them to their place when you leave. 
  • Protect water sources – camp at least 50 metres from lakes and streams
  • Protect plant life – avoid the spread of phytophthora​ and other soil-borne diseases by keeping boots, camping equipment and vehicle tyres clean 

In frequently used areas:

  • Concentrate use on existing tracks and campsites 
  • Always walk on tracks, even when it is wet or muddy, so damage is kept to a narrow band 

In pristine areas:

  • Disperse use to prevent the creation of campsites and tracks
  • Avoid places where impacts are just beginning

​​​3. Dispose of waste properly

  • Pack it in, pack it out. Check your campsite and rest areas for rubbish and spilled food. Pack out all rubbish and leftover food 
  • If there is a toilet, use it. Otherwise bury all faecal waste and toilet paper in holes 15-20cm deep at least 100m from water, camps and tracks. Cover and disguise the hole when finished 
  • Carry out any sanitary pads, tampons and condoms
  • Wash up using hot water, preferably without soap or detergent. Strain and scatter washing up water 50 metres away from water sources 
  • Wash your body at least 50m from water sources  

​​​4. Leave what you find

  • Respect Aboriginal sites and other sites of cultural significance
  • Preserve our past: examine but do not touch cultural or historic structures and artefacts
  • Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them

​5. Minimise campfire impacts – use a fuel stove

  • Many parts of Tasmania are Fuel Stove Only Areas. In these areas fires are not permitted. Carry and use a fuel stove 
  • Out of preference, use fuel stoves even where fires are permitted. Escaped campfires have caused landscape wide damage, and can threaten human, animal and plant life
  • If lighting a fire (where permitted) use only established fire places and keep the fire small

​​6. Respect wildlife

  • Keep wildlife wild. Feeding animals can turn them into pests and may make them sick 
  • Store food and rubbish securely to prevent wildlife finding it
  • Observe wildlife from a distance​

7. Be considerate of your hosts and other visitors

  • Respect Aboriginal culture and country
  • Respect the wishes and regulations of all hosts (eg Aboriginal, pastoral, land managers and locals)
  • Only visit places where you have obtained appropriate permission 
  • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience
  • Let natural sounds prevail – avoid loud voices and noises

Contact

Parks and Wildlife Service
GPO Box 1751
Hobart TAS 7001
Phone: 1300 TASPARKS, (1300 827 727)