Critical Alert 

Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
Applies from 25/6/2020

​​​​​​Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, v​​isitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Travellers to Tasmania are encouraged to register online for a G2G PASS at least three days before their planned travel. Those who receive their G2G PASS QR code before arriving will be able to quickly pass through their port of arrival in Tasmania.

Travellers are required to quarantine for 14 days when coming into Tasmania. If you are required to quarantine in government-designated accommodation​, fees will apply. 

​Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may  be in place. ​

Last reviewed 17/8/2020 08:52 AM


Highfield Historic Site
Highfield Historic House, Highfield Historic Site (photograph: Jonathan Wherrett)

Highfield Historic Site

North-west Tasmania’s pioneering heritage.

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see details
Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
Applies from 25/6/2020

​​​​​​Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, v​​isitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Travellers to Tasmania are encouraged to register online for a G2G PASS at least three days before their planned travel. Those who receive their G2G PASS QR code before arriving will be able to quickly pass through their port of arrival in Tasmania.

Travellers are required to quarantine for 14 days when coming into Tasmania. If you are required to quarantine in government-designated accommodation​, fees will apply. 

​Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may  be in place. ​

Last reviewed 17/8/2020 08:52 AM


About

Perched overlooking Stanley and The Nut on a windy promontory in North-West Tasmania, Highfield Historic Site represents a stunning example of early colonial architecture from the Regency Period (1811-1820). From the large French windows of the homestead​, visitors are treated to dramatic views of the rugged coastline and Bass Strait beyond.

Construction of what is now the Highfield Historic Site marked the first European occupation in ​North-West Tasmania. Building commenced in 1826 by convict labour under the watchful eye of Edward Curr, chief agent of Van Diemen’s Land Company. The property originally occupied some 350,000 acres of agricultural land which has reduced over time and today covers 9.5 acres.

Visitors to the Highfield Historic Site can walk through the old homestead​, outbuildings and surrounding gardens and immerse themselves in the history of this significant property so intrinsically linked to the development of the Circular Head community. 

Admission prices and information on group and school visits are listed on Visiting Highfield Historic Site​. 

This historic site provides the ideal venue for your event or special occasion.

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