Coastal rocks, Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area.
Coastal rocks, Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area. (photograph: Dan Broun)

Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area

Wild beaches and the world’s cleanest air.

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About

​Thundering waves crash against this rugged coastline in North-West Tasmania. Stand at the Edge of the World at Arthur River and breathe in some of the planet’s freshest air.

Stretching from the Arthur River in the north to the Pieman River in the south, the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area is part of the larger takayna/Tarkine area. It’s ​dynamic landscape is constantly being shaped by wind, fire and water.

As far as the eye can see, stretch the ancient homelands of the North West Aboriginal People. They have lived on this land for at least 35,000 years and were the southernmost people in the world at the time of the last ice-age.  Vast middens, hut depressions and rock art are some of the evidence of this powerful, cultural landscape. 

The Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area is a powerful place with a presence that brings a sense of calm and wonder to those who seek to explore the broad, windswept ocean beaches, heath-covered plains and mystical inland forests.

​​​​​The Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area, reserved in 1982, stretches along the spectacularly wild North-West coast of Tasmania, covering over 100 000 hectares. The Roaring Forties generate enormous swells which break on lichen-painted rocks at the foot of windswept dunes. But this place, poetically known as the Edge of the World, attracts rather than deters visitors. It is a hotspot for fishers, surfers, campers, horse riders and recrea​tional vehicle enthusiasts, many of whom regard it as their second home. The area may be remote but the 25 or so permanent residents,  shack owners, campers and day trippers all agree the journey to 'the edge' is well worth it.​

Navigate the area yourself or join a tour group to​ experience by conventional and 4WD vehicle, on horseback, by canoe and on foot.  Arthur-Pieman Recreational Driver Passes ​are required for use of vehicle tracks off the main roads. 

Conventional, 2WD vehicles can drive on any of the main arterial roads without a pass. Drive to the Edge of the World at Arthur River. Visit the shack communities at Nelson Bay, Temma, Sarah Anne Rocks and Couta Rocks. See the drovers hut and cattleyards at Rebecca Creek. laraturunawn/Sundown Point is one of the many significant Tasmanian Aboriginal heritage sites​, protected under the Aboriginal Heritage Act 1975. A 4WD is necessary for the track from the south and a Recreational Drivers Pass is required to access site from the north

Give your vehicle a rest and get intimate with the landscape. Enjoy a walk along a windswept beach, breathe in the fresh West Coast air, explore the sea's debris and marvel at the ancient landscape.

Nature and conservation

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Cultural heritage

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Getting there

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Know before you go

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Access friendly

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Map View

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Experiences in Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area

Statewide

Dogs in parks

Searching for somewhere to take your four-legged friend? There are a number of reserves around Tasmania that are open to visitors with canine companions.

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Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area

Sandy Cape Track

The Sandy Cape Track hugs the wild west coast in the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area, a remote and windswept landscape.

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Accommodation

Stay Overnight

  • Arthur-Pieman camping

Take time to explore the Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area and you'll soon appreciate why the regulars return to family shacks and campsites year after year.

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Sunset over the ocean, Arthur-Pieman Conservation Area

Arthur-Pieman camping