Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Fallen leatherwood flower (Eucryphia lucida) on moss, Lake St Clair
Fallen leatherwood flower (Eucryphia lucida) on moss, Lake St Clair (photograph: Luke O'Brien)

Leatherwood

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Alerts for Leatherwood

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


​​From an ancient group of paleoendemic​ plants (formally widespread but now restricted to a smaller area), the leatherwood is named for its small, leathery leaves. The leatherwood is well known in Tasmania for the distinctive tasting honey produced from its nectar, a lovely yellow, gummy substance collected from the white flowers. During the warmer months of December and January, the four-pet​alled, 3cm diameter flowers can cover​ the whole tree in a white cloak. Leatherwood trees are found in rainforests of the western, central and southern regions.

Common name: Leatherwood​

Scientific name: Eucryphia lucida

Best places to see it​