Critical Alert 

Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
Applies from 25/6/2020

​​​​​​Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, v​​isitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Travellers to Tasmania are encouraged to register online for a G2G PASS at least three days before their planned travel. Those who receive their G2G PASS QR code before arriving will be able to quickly pass through their port of arrival in Tasmania.

Travellers are required to quarantine for 14 days when coming into Tasmania. If you are required to quarantine in government-designated accommodation​, fees will apply. 

​Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may  be in place. ​

Last reviewed 17/8/2020 08:52 AM


Fallen leatherwood flower (Eucryphia lucida) on moss, Lake St Clair
Fallen leatherwood flower (Eucryphia lucida) on moss, Lake St Clair (photograph: Luke O'Brien)

Leatherwood

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Alerts for Leatherwood

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see details
Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
Applies from 25/6/2020

​​​​​​Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, v​​isitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Travellers to Tasmania are encouraged to register online for a G2G PASS at least three days before their planned travel. Those who receive their G2G PASS QR code before arriving will be able to quickly pass through their port of arrival in Tasmania.

Travellers are required to quarantine for 14 days when coming into Tasmania. If you are required to quarantine in government-designated accommodation​, fees will apply. 

​Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may  be in place. ​

Last reviewed 17/8/2020 08:52 AM


​​From an ancient group of paleoendemic​ plants (formally widespread but now restricted to a smaller area), the leatherwood is named for its small, leathery leaves. The leatherwood is well known in Tasmania for the distinctive tasting honey produced from its nectar, a lovely yellow, gummy substance collected from the white flowers. During the warmer months of December and January, the four-pet​alled, 3cm diameter flowers can cover​ the whole tree in a white cloak. Leatherwood trees are found in rainforests of the western, central and southern regions.

Common name: Leatherwood​

Scientific name: Eucryphia lucida

Best places to see it​