Critical Alert 

Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans), fallen along the Russel Falls track, Mt Field National Park
Fallen Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans), Russell Falls, Mt Field National Park (photograph: Joe Shemesh)

Giant ash

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Alerts for Giant ash

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Closed area: All parks and reserves closed
From 26/3/2020, last reviewed 31/3/2020

​​​​​Following advice from the Tasmania Department of Health and Tasmanian Government that our community should limit non-essential travel during the COVID-19 pandemic, the PWS has closed all national parks, reserves and campgrounds until further notice.

The PWS is calling on Tasmanians to support the national effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 and stay home during this time. 

From midnight Thursday 26 March, PWS is temporarily closing all national parks, reserves, campgrounds and facilities to recreational and tourism use. This means that all short walks, day walks, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, tours and camping are now closed to the public.  Washrooms, day use facilities, showers and visitor centres are closed until further notice.​

For more information on these closures please refer to the frequently asked questions.​


​The giant a​sh is the tallest tree species in Australia and second tallest in the world. It can also lay claim to the title of the tallest flowering plant on earth. Its name - regnans - is from the Latin word regnare, which means ‘to rule’. There are several giant ash trees more than 70 metres high along the Russell Falls track at Mount Field National Park. Th​ese trees are estimated to be 350-450 years old. 

​Common name: Giant ash, mountain ash, swamp gum 

Scientific name: Eucalyptus regnans

Where to see​​