Critical Alert 

Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
Applies from 25/6/2020

​​​​​​Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, v​​isitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Travellers to Tasmania are encouraged to register online for a G2G PASS at least three days before their planned travel. Those who receive their G2G PASS QR code before arriving will be able to quickly pass through their port of arrival in Tasmania.

Travellers are required to quarantine for 14 days when coming into Tasmania. If you are required to quarantine in government-designated accommodation​, fees will apply. 

​Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may  be in place. ​

Last reviewed 17/8/2020 08:52 AM


Fagus, deciduous beech (Nothofagus gunnii), Lake Fenton, Mount Field National Park.
Fagus (Nothofagus gunnii), Lake Fenton, Mount Field National Park. (photograph: Peter Grant)

Fagus

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Alerts for Fagus

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see details
Safety alert: COVID-19 Update
Applies from 25/6/2020

​​​​​​Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, v​​isitors must continue to adhere to physical distancing standards and Public Health regulations​.

Travellers to Tasmania are encouraged to register online for a G2G PASS at least three days before their planned travel. Those who receive their G2G PASS QR code before arriving will be able to quickly pass through their port of arrival in Tasmania.

Travellers are required to quarantine for 14 days when coming into Tasmania. If you are required to quarantine in government-designated accommodation​, fees will apply. 

​Please check the alerts page before planning your visit to ensure that you are aware of any access or restrictions that may  be in place. ​

Last reviewed 17/8/2020 08:52 AM


Fagus is ​​​​​​​Tasmania’s only winter deciduous species, and one of only a handful of deciduous species in Australia. Fagus is a paleoendemic species (formally widespread but now restricted to a smaller area), of a Gondwanan group which has similar species in New Zealand and South America. Fagus only occurs in areas that have remained long unburnt.​

The annual 'turning of the fagus' in mid-autumn produces a riot of colour in Tasmania's high country. The crinkle-cut leaves turn from brilliant gold to rust red and orange creating a majestic tapestry in the alpine landscape.

The phenomenon attracts an influx of admirers particularly to Lake Dobson and Tarn Shelf at Mount Field National Park and Cradle Mountain's Dove Lake and Crater Lake​. ​

The colours reach a peak around Anzac Day (April 25) when free guided walks, Discovery Ranger activities and other events at Mount Field and Cradle Mountain are held to celebrate this cherished icon. Keep an eye on our News and events pages for upcoming activities.

​Common name: Fagus, deciduous beech or tanglefoot

Scientific name: Nothofagus gunnii

Best place to see it​