Critical Alert 

Safety alert: Lockdown advice for national parks and reserves in southern Tasmania
Applies from 15/10/2021

​​In an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and keep our community safe, all visitor centres and public facilities in national parks and reserves will be closed within the southern municipalities announced by the Tasmanian Government from 6pm, Friday 15 October until 6pm, Monday 18 October. 

Parks and reserves will remain open during the period of the lockdown for exercise purposes only. 

Visitors should ensure they follow COVID-19 safe practices including maintaining physical distancing while using parks and reserves to exercise. 

The PWS will contact any visitors who have booked to begin overnight walks during this time, including those walkers on the Three Capes Track Experience.

For information visit the Coronavirus website​

Last reviewed 15/10/2021 04:49 PM


Walking along Wineglass Bay
Wineglass Bay (photograph: Chris Crerar)

Performance monitoring, evaluation and reporting

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Alerts for Monitoring

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Safety alert: Lockdown advice for national parks and reserves in southern Tasmania
Applies from 15/10/2021

​​In an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and keep our community safe, all visitor centres and public facilities in national parks and reserves will be closed within the southern municipalities announced by the Tasmanian Government from 6pm, Friday 15 October until 6pm, Monday 18 October. 

Parks and reserves will remain open during the period of the lockdown for exercise purposes only. 

Visitors should ensure they follow COVID-19 safe practices including maintaining physical distancing while using parks and reserves to exercise. 

The PWS will contact any visitors who have booked to begin overnight walks during this time, including those walkers on the Three Capes Track Experience.

For information visit the Coronavirus website​

Last reviewed 15/10/2021 04:49 PM


​​Monitoring and reporting on reserve management effectiveness.

Monitoring, evaluation and reporting on management effectiveness for Tasmania's national parks and reserves is necessary in order to:

  • provide factual feedback about management performance to guide informed decision-making for improving the achievement of the objectives and desired outcomes; and
  • provide public and parliamentary transparency and accountability for the investment of funds in management of Tasmania's national parks and reserves, including World Heritage listed areas.

The monitoring and reporting system for Tasmania's national parks and reserves

The Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) has developed a state-wide management effectiveness monitoring and reporting system to measure and report on evidence of management progress, achievements and challenges across Tasmania's public national parks and reserves estate. Key features of the system are that it is; outcomes focused, evidence-based, operationally practical and scalable, and transparent to all interested parties. 

To understand how management of Tasmania's national parks and reserves is performing, the PWS and its stakeholders need reliable, factual information about a variety of topics known as key performance areas (KPAs). These KPAs form the framework of the m​​on​itori​ng an​d reporting system for Tasmania's national parks and reserves.

Evaluated case studies

An important component of monitoring and reporting is evaluated case studies of the monitored effectiveness of significant and selected projects.  Examples of evaluated case study reports can be found:

Evaluating management effectiveness for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area

The first comprehensive evaluation report examining management effectiveness for the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area (TWWHA) was published as the State of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area - an evaluation of management effectiveness, Report No 1, 2004

Key commitments for monitoring, evaluation and reporting under the current TWWHA Ma​nagement Plan 2016 include:

  • concise State of the TWWHA Reports will be prepared every three years  
  • regular Status and Trends Reporting
  • evaluated case studies for (i) community partnerships; (ii) access to Country for Tasmanian Aboriginal people; (iii) management of the road network; and (iv) monitoring and data collection for priority areas of the walking track network.

Integrating evaluation into reserve management plans


The PWS is progressively integrating statements of key desired outcomes and provisions for monitoring, evaluation and reporting into new reserve management plans.

Where possible, the PWS is aiming to identify what would be a 'great result', a 'satisfactory or acceptable result' and an 'unsatisfactory or unacceptable result' for each identified key desired outcome in a reserve management plan or major project.  This establishes an agreed framework for assessing how management is performing.  The Coningham Nature Recreation Area Management Statement 2009 is an example of that work.​