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Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

True's Beaked Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
True's Beaked Whales in the southern hemisphere are dark grey/brown above and pale grey underneath with dark eye patches. The lower jaw and cheeks are pale grey to whitish in colour with black lips. In the southern hemisphere the rear part of the body is white with the upper part of the tail flukes being dark grey. Adults reach 5.3m in length and weigh 1.5 tonnes. They have rounded bodies, short fins and a small head with a short cone-shaped beak and rounded melon. Males have a single pair of teeth right at the tip of the jaw. The slightly hooked dorsal fin is about two thirds along the back and the flippers are rounded. These whales are rarely sighted with the first live sighting not recorded until 1995. These three animals had a typical blow and roll sequence lasting about 10 seconds bringing the the rostrum clear first followed by the head to eye level before rolling under. The blow is indistinct.

General Information

Only discovered in 1913, True was so excited he named them mirus meaning wonderful. They occur in cool temperate deep oceanic waters and generally feed on squid and fish. There appear to be two distinct subgroups – those found in northern North Atlantic and those in southern parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. They are around 2.2m long at birth. However little is known about their lifecycle.

Stranding Information

True's Beaked Whales are rarely seen and most information comes from rare strandings of single dead specimens. Strandings have been recorded from South Africa (including a mother and calf), Western Australia, Victoria and Tasmania (single dead specimen).