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New picnic facilities for Penny's Lagoon

08/08/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has completed the construction of a new picnic shelter at Penny's Lagoon within the Lavinia State Reserve on King Island.
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Celebrating World Ranger Day

31/07/2018

The work of Tasmania's rangers is vital in the daily management of our 19 national parks and more than 800 reserves, encompassing approximately 50 per cent of the State.
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Southwest ecological burns important for orange-bellied parrot conservation

22/03/2018

Planned ecological burns in Southwest National Park will help regenerate important habitat areas for the critically endangered orange-bellied parrot.More

True's Beaked Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
True's Beaked Whales in the southern hemisphere are dark grey/brown above and pale grey underneath with dark eye patches. The lower jaw and cheeks are pale grey to whitish in colour with black lips. In the southern hemisphere the rear part of the body is white with the upper part of the tail flukes being dark grey. Adults reach 5.3m in length and weigh 1.5 tonnes. They have rounded bodies, short fins and a small head with a short cone-shaped beak and rounded melon. Males have a single pair of teeth right at the tip of the jaw. The slightly hooked dorsal fin is about two thirds along the back and the flippers are rounded. These whales are rarely sighted with the first live sighting not recorded until 1995. These three animals had a typical blow and roll sequence lasting about 10 seconds bringing the the rostrum clear first followed by the head to eye level before rolling under. The blow is indistinct.

General Information

Only discovered in 1913, True was so excited he named them mirus meaning wonderful. They occur in cool temperate deep oceanic waters and generally feed on squid and fish. There appear to be two distinct subgroups – those found in northern North Atlantic and those in southern parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. They are around 2.2m long at birth. However little is known about their lifecycle.

Stranding Information

True's Beaked Whales are rarely seen and most information comes from rare strandings of single dead specimens. Strandings have been recorded from South Africa (including a mother and calf), Western Australia, Victoria and Tasmania (single dead specimen).