Our Latest News

Easter safety is paramount for our parks and reserves

18/04/2019

The Parks and Wildlife Service encourages visitors and Tasmanians alike to get outdoors and get active - especially in our parks and reserves.More

Good news, Hartz Mountain National Park and other tracks are open!

17/04/2019

In time for Easter walking, PWS have been able to re-open a number of tracks.More

New Mt Mawson Shelter officially opened ahead of ski season

29/03/2019

The new Mt Mawson Public Shelter was today officially opened and will provide a new level of amenity for southern Tasmania's only ski field, as well as upgraded facilities for bushwalkers heading to the iconic Tarn Shelf walk in Mt Field National Park.More

Dusky Dolphin

Dusky Dolphin
Males reach up to 2.1m in length and females 1.9m. They are a small, robust dolphin, dark grey to black above and white below, with side blazes and patches of grey. The dorsal fin is two toned with the trailing edge a much lighter grey. They have a long, light grey patch on their foreside leading to a short, dark grey beak (shorter than in a Common Dolphin). The throat and belly are white and they have a large white Y-shaped patch running from the dorsal fin to the tail. They have a moderately curved dorsal fin.

General Information

Dusky Dolphins occur in cold temperate waters off New
Distribution map of sightings and strandings (click to enlarge)
Zealand, South Africa and South America as three distinct subspecies. They have also been spotted off southern Australia. They breed over summer so females and calves tend to be closer inshore at this time feeding on small schooling fish and returning to deeper water at other times to chase mobile prey. Females reach sexual maturity at around 18 years and breed at three yearly intervals, weaning calves at around 18 months. Climate change will impact on their distribution.

Stranding Information

There have been five stranding events of Dusky Dolphins in Tasmania, usually as a single dead specimen. One specimen was a female giving birth. In New Zealand, Dusky Dolphins have been successfully refloated after mass stranding.