Our Latest News

Lookout at Bruny Island Neck reopens

12/11/2018

Bruny Island is one of Tasmania's most loved tourism destinations, and the upgrade of vital infrastructure will ensure it can reach its full tourism potential.More

History unlocked at Richmond Gaol

12/11/2018

Investment in the restoration of the Gaoler's House at Richmond Gaol will enhance the visitor experience at one of Tasmania's key historic sites.More

Campfire restrictions in national parks and reserves

09/11/2018

Restrictions on campfires, pot fires and other solid fuel stoves will come in to place from next Wednesday (November 14) at identified Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) campgrounds around the State to help reduce the risk of bushfires.More

Pygmy Killer Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Pygmy Killer Whales look like a miniature version of the False Killer Whale, reaching 2-3m in length. It can be distinguished by its smaller size and white lips and snout. Their body narrows towards the dorsal fin which is how it gets its name (attenuate) which means thinning. They are generally black or grey with a high, sickle-shaped dorsal fin. They have a paler grey area on each side and a white patch between the flippers. They reach up to 2.6m in length and just over 200kg. As a tropical deep water species this is unlikely to be seen in Tasmanian waters. They can sometimes be confused with the Melon-headed Whale but their smaller size and rounded flippers and beakless head should help separate them.

General Information

Pygmy Killer Whales swim in groups of up to 50 animals and occasionally with dolphins. They reach maturity at about 2m and live at least 14 years. They eat squid and fish and have been known to take dolphins. In New South Wales they may be seen between August and February but are rarely seen in Tasmania.

Stranding Information

There are some stranding records of pygmy killer whales from several Australian states, including one from Tasmania. They are single stranders and often infested with nematodes.