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PWS - Fires update and impacts

20/02/2019

Background: A number of fires were ignited by dry lightning that crossed the state in late December 2018 and mid-January 2019. The storms of 15 January 2019 resulted in approximately 2,400 lightning strikes and caused over 60 new ignitions.More

PWS Fire Update - Friday 15 February 2019

15/02/2019

Parks and Wildlife Tasmania (PWS) can advise the following locations, reserves and tracks have been re-opened today (Friday 15 February).More

PWS Fire Update - Thursday 14 February 2019

14/02/2019

Parks and Wildlife Tasmania (PWS) can advise the following locations, reserves and tracks have been re-opened.More

Arnouxs Beaked Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Like other beaked whales, Arnouxs Beaked Whales have a dolphin-like beak with the lower jaw extending past the upper jaw. Both sexes have a pair of triangular teeth at the jaw tip. Older animals have a second pair set further back. They have rounded flippers, a tail fluke without notch and a small sickle-shaped dorsal fin positioned two thirds along the body. They have a unique crescent shaped blowhole in the centre of the head facing forward. Arnouxs Beaked Whales are counter shaded, being dark above and lighter grey underneath. Many have several dark diagonal bands on the sides. They reach 9.4m in length.

General Information

Arnouxs Beaked Whales usually swim in groups of up to 16 animals although up to 80 have been seen. It is a deep water species which feeds on squid and fish and dives to depths of up to 1km. It is believed they reach maturity at around 20 years of age and may live up to 50 years. It is considered a gregarious whale.

Stranding Information

Arnouxs Beaked Whale is a rare strander with only six recorded from Australia including two in Western Australia and Tasmania. Around 40 strandings of Arnouxs Beaked Whales have been recorded in New Zealand, including several groups of up to six animals.