Our Latest News

Sustainable Timber Tasmania and Parks and Wildlife Service announce road opening

21/05/2019

Florentine Road and Arve Road (to the Hartz Mountain junction) are officially reopened to the public.More

Easter safety is paramount for our parks and reserves

18/04/2019

The Parks and Wildlife Service encourages visitors and Tasmanians alike to get outdoors and get active - especially in our parks and reserves.More

Good news, Hartz Mountain National Park and other tracks are open!

17/04/2019

In time for Easter walking, PWS have been able to re-open a number of tracks.More

Andrews Beaked Whale

Andrews Beaked Whale
There are only about 35 records of this whale and most from Australasian waters. The most distinctive feature are the pair of massive teeth which protrude midway along the beak in the darker coloured male. They have a small head with dolphin-like beak, which is whitish in colour (mainly towards the front in the male). They have a small, low, blunt tipped triangular dorsal fin set two thirds or more along the body, rounded flippers and tail flukes without a notch.

General Information

Newborns are about 2.2m, adult females 4.6m and males 4.8m and reach 2.6 tonnes. Usually Andrews Beaked Whales are solitary but may occur in groups up to six. They generally occur 1000km offshore in deep water and feed on squid.

Stranding Information

Most strandings occur in Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria, Tasmania and New South Wales with most sightings and strandings being in New Zealand and South Australia but even these are rare. All ten Australian records and 4 New Zealand records were for strandings in summer and autumn suggesting a seasonal movement inshore at this time however 11 other animals stranded in New Zealand in winter and spring. Studies of anthropogenic noise on beaked whales suggest that immature animals are more susceptible. Beaked whales use a relatively high echolocation of 120kHz or more.