Our Latest News

Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

Common Dolphin

Photo by Angela Anderson
The unique crisscross (hourglass) pattern of colour on the sides make these dolphins easily distinguishable from other dolphins. There are four parts to the colour pattern – a dark grey/black mantle along the back, light to medium grey on the sides, white on the abdomen and a yellowish anterior thoracic patch. Common Dolphins reach between 1-2m with males being larger than females and weigh up to 200kg. Their slender build and hourglass pattern can be easily seen when frolicking in the water which they often do. They have a much longer beak than the Bottle-nosed Dolphin and a high backward curving dorsal fin. Common Dolphins have long, thin flippers and thin tail flukes with a slight notch in the centre. When spotted in Tasmania's coastal rivers or inshore they are generally in groups averaging around 12 animals, however in the open ocean they can range in groups up to several thousand. They occur in all seasons off Tasmania.

General Information

There are three species of Delphinus in the world. The Common Dolphin which occurs around Australia appears to live in two distinct groups one in the Indian Ocean and another in the Tasman Sea. They are generally an offshore species and feed on small fish and crustaceans. Calves are born all year round and mature at about 5 years and live until their early 20s.

Stranding Information

Common Dolphin Stranding and Sightings(click to enlarge)
Common Dolphins are the most common dolphin strander in Tasmania. At least one third of strandings are mass strandings, with an average number of 12 animals at a time. This may be because they are less familiar with coastlines than Bottle-nosed Dolphins. There have been several records of them stranding in Tasmania in association with Orca sightings probably due to panic. Their small size makes them easy to manipulate back into the water at a stranding and they should be released together as a pod.