Our Latest News

Mt Strzelecki walk back on track

28/06/2019

Flinders Island's Mt Strzelecki walking track has received an upgrade which will improve the experience for walkers and visitors, as well as environmental management.More

New car park for Ben Lomond National Park

28/06/2019

A new visitor carpark is now complete at Ben Lomond National Park. The car park will be opened to visitors and fully operational in the coming weeks in time for this winter's first major snow fall.More

Planned burn success on Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area sites

28/06/2019

The Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area experienced significant wildfire events between January and March this year, yet there are still areas that require pro-active fire management for the protection and conservation of the area's values.More

Fire Ecology

How You Can Help

One of the best ways you can help to manage fire in our national parks and reserves is to only light fires in proper fire places, or better still, not light fires at all.

The Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area and some other parks have been declared Fuel Stove Only Areas. This is because environmentally damaging bushfires have started from campfires. Many of the unique vegetation communities within reserves are highly sensitive to fire. Campfires can also lead to local environmental degradation around campsites. Fines of up to $5,000 can be imposed for lighting fires in such areas.

With a fuel stove you will not need a campfire, so there is no risk of your fire burning down into the peat soil, or of sparks blowing away to start a bushfire.

Fuel stoves

We recommend that you use fuel stoves instead of campfires in all situations irrespective of whether you are within the World Heritage Area or not. In particular, do not use campfires in rainforest, alpine or conifer communities. Do not light fires on peat. Fires lit on peat can burn into the soil and smoulder underground for months, causing bushfires in the next hot weather. It is illegal to light fires on peat anywhere in Tasmania. Fines of up to $15,000 can be imposed.

If you see any fire please report it to the local Parks and Wildlife Service office or to the Tasmania Fire Service (phone 000).

If you live near a park or reserve, there are many ways you can prepare your property to be fire safe. Contact the Tasmanian Fire Service for more information.

For further information on the use of fire and fuelstoves, see Before you Walk - Tasmania's Essential Bushwalking Guide and Trip Planner.