Our Latest News

Easter safety is paramount for our parks and reserves

18/04/2019

The Parks and Wildlife Service encourages visitors and Tasmanians alike to get outdoors and get active - especially in our parks and reserves.More

Good news, Hartz Mountain National Park and other tracks are open!

17/04/2019

In time for Easter walking, PWS have been able to re-open a number of tracks.More

New Mt Mawson Shelter officially opened ahead of ski season

29/03/2019

The new Mt Mawson Public Shelter was today officially opened and will provide a new level of amenity for southern Tasmania's only ski field, as well as upgraded facilities for bushwalkers heading to the iconic Tarn Shelf walk in Mt Field National Park.More

Nelson Falls

24. Nelson Falls

time 20 minute return (700m one way)
access Located on the Lyell Highway (A10) between Queenstown and Derwent Bridge. See map
fees Park entry fees apply. (Lake St Clair or Queenstown are the closest places to obtain a pass.)
facilities Picnic and toilet facilities located 33km east at the Franklin River
grade Level 2. Some steps
what to take Group A items, plus lunch and water
cautions Supervise children, flowing waters
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

These delightful falls are reached after a very easy walk. Break the long drive and stretch your legs; you won’t be disappointed.

Highlights

Along the boardwalk to Nelson Falls you will come across interpretation panels highlighting the ancient plants you see along the way, including at least seven species of fern. These interpretation panels will take you on a journey back in time to when Tasmania was a part of the great supercontinent of Gondwana.

Among the forest trees you will discover ancient species that once dominated the Australian landmass, but are now confined to the wetter regions of Tasmania and southeast and eastern mainland Australia. Many of the species of these cool temperate rainforests are only suited to the cool, moist conditions of places such as the Nelson Valley.

The species of these rainforests have much in common with the rainforests of New Zealand and South America. Indeed, the ancestors of these plants once flourished on the ancient supercontinent, Gondwana, which comprised today's southern continents. Following the breakup of Gondwana, these species found themselves separated by vast distances. The similarity of the rainforest species of these continents is the legacy of this common origin.