Our Latest News

Viewing platform upgrades for Rocky Cape's Aboriginal heritage sites

13/02/2018

Two viewing platforms have been replaced as part of visitor facility improvements at Rocky Cape National Park on the North-West Coast. The platforms are at the Lee Archer Cave and South Cave sites, which have highly significant Aboriginal heritage values.More

Urban focus for World Wetlands Day

01/02/2018

'Wetlands for a sustainable future' is the theme for World Wetlands Day 2018. This international celebration of the significance of wetland environments is held annually on 2 February.More

Stage Three of Three Capes Track complete

29/01/2018

Stage Three of the award-winning Three Capes Track has now been completed. The Cape Raoul and Shipstern Bluff lookout tracks have been upgraded to a class 3 dry boot standard track consistent with the existing Three Capes walks.More

Carnivorous marsupials

The family Dasyuridae includes the well-known Tasmanian devil, eastern quolls (native cats), spotted-tailed quolls (tiger cats) and antechinuses (marsupial mice). The closely-related Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, also a carnivorous marsupial, is classified in its own family, Thylacinidae.

Over forty species have been described from Australia and New Guinea. Seven occur in Tasmania:


The carnivorous marsupials are among the most impressive of hunting mammals. However, their smaller size, nocturnal habits and cryptic behaviour often leaves them overshadowed in the popular imagination by the conspicuous carnivores of Africa and Asia, such as leopards, tigers and lions.

As with all marsupials, the carnivorous species possess a pouch, although in some species, the pouch is little more than a mere fold. Typically, the young are carried within the pouch until such time that they are literally being dragged along the ground while the mother hunts. At this stage, the young are generally left in a den (such as a hollow log) while the mother hunts.

Although most of the members of this family are small, about the size of a rat, Tasmania has the distinction of being home to the four largest carnivorous marsupials in the world.