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Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Maintaining vigilance with campfires

03/11/2017

Parks and Wildlife Service staff have thanked the many campers who have heeded the restrictions placed on campfires and pot fires, but ask that park and reserve visitors continue to take care while the fire risk remains high in certain areas of the State.More

Liffey Falls State Reserve

Introduction

Liffey Falls

Liffey Falls framed by myrtle-beech
(Photo by Steve Johnson)

It is a matter of considerable argument among Tasmanians as to which is the prettiest waterfall in their State - Russell Falls or Liffey Falls?

Liffey Falls State Reserve is nestled within cool temperate rainforest on the slopes of the Great Western Tiers. Framed by the dominant species of Tasmania's cool temperate rainforests - myrtle, sassafrass and leatherwood, the falls are understandably a popular spot among both Tasmanians and visitors alike. A nature walk leads from a picnic area near the carpark down through forests of towering eucalypts and tree ferns to the falls. A number of smaller falls are passed along the way.

The Liffey Falls State Reserve was included within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area in 1989, a tribute to the globally significant value of the region. The area reveals a rich human heritage and insights into the forces which shaped the landscape over the past 250 million years.

A picnic area lies within the upper part of the reserve. The road between the Upper Liffey Falls Picnic Area and the Lower Liffey Campground is a steep, slippery gravel road. it is not suitable for large vehicles, caravans or buses.