Our Latest News

Wielangta Road bridges complete

31/07/2017

The replacement of four bridges on Wielangta Road is now complete, signaling a major step forward in the overall upgrade of the road.More

Celebrating World Ranger Day

31/07/2017

The Hodgman Liberal Government recognises the hard-working people working in Tasmania's national parks as part of World Ranger Day today.
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Hastings Cave temporary closure for maintenance

31/07/2017

Hastings Cave and Thermal Springs will be closed for one week for essential maintenance.More

Aboriginal Heritage

British "Law"

According to the British, the settlement of Tasmania involved the takeover of unsettled land which the Aboriginals, as savages, had no claim to. The British believed that civilised people built structures and utilised the land, and that they were of the Christian faith.

Because the settlement was considered to involve land possessed by the British through discovery rather than conquest the Aboriginals automatically became British subjects. Had this also involved British citizenship then perhaps there would not have been such devastating impacts on the Aboriginals, however, from the onset they were not afforded any of the rights of British citizenship. As they were considered to be savages they had no rights to their land or land ownership - any attempts they made to defend what for centuries had been theirs was considered criminal in intent under British law. 

In one instance two Aboriginals were hung for the murders of around 5 settlers. Whilst there was no question of their guilt it is interesting to note that during the trial they were unable to give evidence to protect themselves or plead for a lesser sentence because they were not Christian.

For more information in relation to Aboriginal heritage within Tasmania see the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania website: www.aboriginalheritage.tas.gov.au