Our Latest News

Celebrating the achievements of landcarers

04/12/2017

The Tamar Island Wetland Cares Volunteer Group has been recognised in the 2017 Landcare Tasmania Awards.More

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Aboriginal Heritage

Martial Law

The equity of justice suggested by this 1830s pictogram was rarely achieved
Martial law was declared in 1828 by Lieutenant Governor Arthur. The declaration meant that military personnel were able to arrest Aboriginals without a warrant or shoot them on sight. Martial law applied to the settled areas, which was the area between Hobart and Launceston.

There were six roving parties established to hunt the Aboriginals from the settled districts. Each party was assigned to a different location to provide the best overall coverage for the settlement. Between 1828 and 1830 the roving parties had captured 20 Aboriginals and killed a further 60 - possibly more.

Martial law was revoked in 1832. During its four years of operation over 89 deaths of British/Europeans are attributed to Aboriginals, with many more injured. Of the 200+ Aboriginals who had been recorded in and around the settled district in 1828, only 50 remained.

For more information in relation to Aboriginal heritage within Tasmania see the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania website: www.aboriginalheritage.tas.gov.au