Our Latest News

New lease of life for original lighthouse vents

15/05/2018

As part of the ongoing conservation of the Cape Bruny and Maatsuyker Island lighthouses, a team effort has been underway to restore the original bronze vents from the lighthouses' lantern rooms.More

Record visitor numbers at Highfield Historic Site

09/05/2018

Visitation numbers at Highfield Historic Site in Stanley have reached a record high, with 12,535 people visiting in the 12 months ending March 2018.More

Cradle Mountain shuttle bus tender awarded

08/05/2018

A new bus fleet featuring environmentally friendly technology and vehicles with improved accessibility and increased capacity will help to meet increasing visitor numbers following the awarding of the tender to McDermott Coaches.More

Eaglehawk Neck

Introduction

North View of Eaglehawk Neck

'North View of Eaglehawk Neck'
(Courtesy of George Brown Esq.)

The Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site offers visitors a unique perspective upon the security system which operated throughout the Tasman and Forestier Peninsulas during the convict period. The infamous dogline which ran across the Neck was devised to prevent the escape of prisoners from Port Arthur, while a semaphore station provided communication with the rest of the peninsula.

The system proved quite effective in achieving its purpose; however, it was not enough to prevent the escape of the infamous Martin Cash, who was to become one of Tasmania's best-known bushrangers.

Today, the only building which survives is the Officers' Quarters, erected in 1832. It is thought to be the oldest timber military building in Australia. The building has been restored and now acts as a museum and interpretation centre. Don't miss the opportunity to spend a little time in the Officer's Quarters to discover the remarkable history of the Eaglehawk Neck Historic Site.