Our Latest News

Celebrating the achievements of landcarers

04/12/2017

The Tamar Island Wetland Cares Volunteer Group has been recognised in the 2017 Landcare Tasmania Awards.More

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

St Helens Point Conservation Area

Introduction

Extensive sand dunes are a feature of the St Helens Point Conservation Area (1066 ha). In the past, the introduced marram grass Ammophila arenaria has been used to help stabilise eroding dunes. Where it occurs, the native grass Spinifex hirsutus also plays an important role. Its sand-binding ability prevents sand from moving inland and allows more complex plant communities to develop.

The sand dunes can be damaged by both foot and vehicular traffic. This can lead to 'blowouts' and damage to the sensitive beach environment. For this reason vehicular use is restricted to an area set aside at Peron Dunes.

Toilets with wheelchair access are available.