Our Latest News

New lease of life for original lighthouse vents

15/05/2018

As part of the ongoing conservation of the Cape Bruny and Maatsuyker Island lighthouses, a team effort has been underway to restore the original bronze vents from the lighthouses' lantern rooms.More

Record visitor numbers at Highfield Historic Site

09/05/2018

Visitation numbers at Highfield Historic Site in Stanley have reached a record high, with 12,535 people visiting in the 12 months ending March 2018.More

Cradle Mountain shuttle bus tender awarded

08/05/2018

A new bus fleet featuring environmentally friendly technology and vehicles with improved accessibility and increased capacity will help to meet increasing visitor numbers following the awarding of the tender to McDermott Coaches.More

Fire Ecology

How You Can Help

One of the best ways you can help to manage fire in our national parks and reserves is to only light fires in proper fire places, or better still, not light fires at all.

The Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area and some other parks have been declared Fuel Stove Only Areas. This is because environmentally damaging bushfires have started from campfires. Many of the unique vegetation communities within reserves are highly sensitive to fire. Campfires can also lead to local environmental degradation around campsites. Fines of up to $5,000 can be imposed for lighting fires in such areas.

With a fuel stove you will not need a campfire, so there is no risk of your fire burning down into the peat soil, or of sparks blowing away to start a bushfire.

Fuel stoves

We recommend that you use fuel stoves instead of campfires in all situations irrespective of whether you are within the World Heritage Area or not. In particular, do not use campfires in rainforest, alpine or conifer communities. Do not light fires on peat. Fires lit on peat can burn into the soil and smoulder underground for months, causing bushfires in the next hot weather. It is illegal to light fires on peat anywhere in Tasmania. Fines of up to $15,000 can be imposed.

If you see any fire please report it to the local Parks and Wildlife Service office or to the Tasmania Fire Service (phone 000).

If you live near a park or reserve, there are many ways you can prepare your property to be fire safe. Contact the Tasmanian Fire Service for more information.

For further information on the use of fire and fuelstoves, see Before you Walk - Tasmania's Essential Bushwalking Guide and Trip Planner.