Our Latest News

Exciting new proposal for Tasmania's South East Cape

16/10/2017

Award-winning local tourism operator Ian Johnstone can now progress a new project to lease and licence negotiations under the Tourism Opportunities in Tasmania's National Parks, Reserves and Crown Land process.More

Wineglass Bay track upgrade complete

16/10/2017

One of Tasmania's most iconic tourism experiences, the walk to Wineglass Bay from the lookout to the beach, has now re-opened after a $500,000 upgrade initiated through the Government's Tourism Infrastructure in Parks fund.
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Tourism opportunity for Tasman Island

12/10/2017

Tourists could soon enjoy the beautiful Tasman National Park from the air, as a change to the management plan could open it up for sensitive and appropriate aircraft access.More

Aboriginal Heritage

Martial Law

The equity of justice suggested by this 1830s pictogram was rarely achieved
Martial law was declared in 1828 by Lieutenant Governor Arthur. The declaration meant that military personnel were able to arrest Aboriginals without a warrant or shoot them on sight. Martial law applied to the settled areas, which was the area between Hobart and Launceston.

There were six roving parties established to hunt the Aboriginals from the settled districts. Each party was assigned to a different location to provide the best overall coverage for the settlement. Between 1828 and 1830 the roving parties had captured 20 Aboriginals and killed a further 60 - possibly more.

Martial law was revoked in 1832. During its four years of operation over 89 deaths of British/Europeans are attributed to Aboriginals, with many more injured. Of the 200+ Aboriginals who had been recorded in and around the settled district in 1828, only 50 remained.

For more information in relation to Aboriginal heritage within Tasmania see the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania website: www.aboriginalheritage.tas.gov.au