Our Latest News

Three Capes Track special winter offer

27/04/2017

Tasmania's award-winning Three Capes Track has been a huge hit with walkers, with a total of 14,495 local, national and international visitors since opening in December 2015.More

Tenders called for Mt Mawson shelter

27/03/2017

Tenders have been called for the construction of a new public shelter at Mt Mawson within Mount Field National Park.More

Local company awarded contract to replace Lake Tahune Hut and facilities

22/03/2017

Westbury company Valley Workshop has been awarded the contract to demolish and replace the hut and toilet facilities at Lake Tahune on the Frenchmans Cap walking track, a project worth $450,000.More

Lake St Clair, a wilderness carved by glaciers

Lake St Clair is at the southern end of the world famous Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park and is part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.  



Carved out by ice during several glaciations over the last two million years, this is the deepest lake in Australia and the headwaters of the Derwent River. Aboriginal people called the lake Leeawuleena, meaning "sleeping water".  



The area around Lake St Clair offers a wealth of walks, ranging from leisurely strolls to overnight bushwalks,

Lake St Clair reflectionsLake St Clair reflections

 as well as beautiful forests to explore.  Around Cynthia Bay you are likely to meet two species of wallaby. These are the Bennetts or red-necked wallaby, and the smaller, more timid Tasmanian pademelon. Occasionally wombats and quolls can be seen after dark.  Echidnas and platypuses are commonly seen around Cynthia Bay too. Echidnas are most frequently seen from spring through to autumn in light bushland, often near tracks. Their presence is often indicated by freshly scratched earth. Platypuses are harder to find. They are quite sensitive to noise, but can sometimes be seen in the lake feeding around the shoreline.  



Cynthia Bay sits on the boundary between dry and wet sclerophyll forests, two habitats that are home to a wide variety of birds. Many, such as black currawongs, strong-billed and black-headed honeyeaters, and the yellow wattlebird are found only in Tasmania.  



Plan a visit to Lake St Clair to experience what this wonderful end of the park has on offer. More information can be found at www.parks.tas.gov.au/natparks/stclair