Our Latest News

Improved access to a World Heritage view

24/07/2017

An upgrade of the popular viewing platform on the shore of Lake St Clair has now been completed, improving disability access to one of the finest viewing points of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.More

Improved access to two of the North-west's natural wonders

24/07/2017

The North-west is home to some of Tasmania's most stunning natural attractions, and we are pleased to announce upgrades have now been completed at Trowutta Arch and Dip Falls.More

Overland Track bookings open with a rush

18/07/2017

Tasmania's iconic world-renowned bushwalks are a key driver behind the boom in visitor numbers to the state, and bookings for the Overland Track walking season have opened with a rush for the peak summer period.More

Ross Female Factory

Introduction

Catherine Bartley, a female convict

Catherine Bartley,
a female convict
(Archives Office of Tasmania)

Ross Female Factory Site, built in the early 1840's, incarcerated female convicts from 1847 to 1854. It was one of four female factories established in Tasmania. The name, "Female Factory" was abbreviated from the British institutional title "Manufactory", and referred to the prisons' role as a Work House.

Today, the Ross Female Factory is a protected Historic Site, managed by the Parks & Wildlife Service and the Tasmanian Wool Centre of Ross. Open to the public, the Overseer's Cottage contains a display on the history of this unique convict site, including a model of the Female Factory in 1851.

Although little architecture remains above the ground, Ross Factory is the most archaeologically intact female convict site in Australia. (See the Ross Female Factory Archaeological Project for further details).