Our Latest News

Improved access to a World Heritage view

24/07/2017

An upgrade of the popular viewing platform on the shore of Lake St Clair has now been completed, improving disability access to one of the finest viewing points of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area.More

Improved access to two of the North-west's natural wonders

24/07/2017

The North-west is home to some of Tasmania's most stunning natural attractions, and we are pleased to announce upgrades have now been completed at Trowutta Arch and Dip Falls.More

Overland Track bookings open with a rush

18/07/2017

Tasmania's iconic world-renowned bushwalks are a key driver behind the boom in visitor numbers to the state, and bookings for the Overland Track walking season have opened with a rush for the peak summer period.More

Lisdillon Salt Works

Introduction

Watercolour of the Saltworks 1874, by Sarah Mitchell

Watercolour of the Saltworks 1874,
by Sarah Mitchell

Salt was used in the early years of the colony for preserving food and hides. It was also used in the manufacture of articles such as soap and earthenware. Most supplies were imported from England at relatively high cost.

The Lisdillon salt works were one of a number of small scale, speculative works established in Van Diemens Land to meet colonial needs. The Site is one of only two early salt manufacture works in eastern Australia where substantial remains can still be found (the other being at Norfolk Island). The ruins here form an intriguing and highly significant part of the industrial heritage of Tasmania and Australia. A close examination of the structures and the surrounding landscape reveal much about the early process of salt making.