Our Latest News

100 years on, Old Pelion Hut retains its charm

19/09/2017

One of Tasmania's favourite historic mountain huts, Old Pelion Hut in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, is celebrating its centenary this year.More

Future-proofing our tourism icons

18/09/2017

Environment and Parks Minister Matthew Groom has announced that $8 million will be allocated to upgrade vital infrastructure in our parks and reserves over the next two years.More

Tenders advertised for Freycinet Master Plan

28/08/2017

Freycinet is one of the absolute jewels in Tasmania's crown, with locals and visitors flocking to the area in droves to experience one of the world's most stunning areas.
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Aboriginal Heritage

Encounters

Aboriginal bark huts, as depicted during the Baudin voyage
Aboriginals have been in Tasmania for at least 35,000 years. The first European explorer to discover Tasmania, and subsequently name it Van Diemen’s Land, was Abel Janszoon Tasman, in 1642. He did not record any encounters with Aboriginals. It is possible that his journey was noticed by many tribes as he passed through their ‘country’, but as there are no ethnographic records from an Aboriginal perspective for this time, it is impossible to know for sure. Imagine seeing something for the first time, especially something which was so foreign in its very nature.

Other visitors to ‘Tasmania’ prior to British settlement include Marc-Joseph Marion du Fresne in 1772, Captain James Cook in 1777, Bruni d’Entrecasteaux 1792-93 and Nicolas Baudin in 1802. Some of these explorers recorded interactions with the Aboriginals and the exchange of ‘tokens’; others did not see any Aboriginals but witnessed fires burning along the coast. Of the interactions there was at least one incident which resulted in injury and fatality.

For more information in relation to Aboriginal heritage within Tasmania see the Aboriginal Heritage Tasmania website: www.aboriginalheritage.tas.gov.au