Our Latest News

Upgraded Julius River bridges improve visitor access

23/02/2018

Bridge upgrades at the Julius River Regional Reserve are now complete.More

Viewing platform upgrades for Rocky Cape's Aboriginal heritage sites

13/02/2018

Two viewing platforms have been replaced as part of visitor facility improvements at Rocky Cape National Park on the North-West Coast. The platforms are at the Lee Archer Cave and South Cave sites, which have highly significant Aboriginal heritage values.More

Urban focus for World Wetlands Day

01/02/2018

'Wetlands for a sustainable future' is the theme for World Wetlands Day 2018. This international celebration of the significance of wetland environments is held annually on 2 February.More

Mt Direction Historic Site

Introduction

Mount Direction - the semaphore station at Launceston in 1844
The Mount Direction Semaphore Station was one of a number of stations set up in the Tamar Valley during the mid-nineteenth century. It provided a central link between the other stations which allowed communication to stretch from Launceston to George Town.  The Tamar Valley system is one of the earliest in Australia.

The Mount Direction site is particularly important as it is one of the only examples remaining; other stations in the Tamar system have been demolished or built over.  Mount Direction is the only site which still has its major parts in place, such as the old residence, out-buildings and walls.

Mount Direction Historic Site is important as an example of the communications system used in British military colonies during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  It was used for both government and maritime functions.  It is different from similar stations in southern Tasmania (such as Tasman peninsula) because of its well-built nearby house.