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Wielangta Road bridges complete

31/07/2017

The replacement of four bridges on Wielangta Road is now complete, signaling a major step forward in the overall upgrade of the road.More

Celebrating World Ranger Day

31/07/2017

The Hodgman Liberal Government recognises the hard-working people working in Tasmania's national parks as part of World Ranger Day today.
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Hastings Cave temporary closure for maintenance

31/07/2017

Hastings Cave and Thermal Springs will be closed for one week for essential maintenance.More

Wombat Mange

The population of wombats in the area west of the Tamar River and in Narawntapu National Park reduced markedly between 2010 and 2016. The cause of this decline has been attributed to a severe outbreak of mange.

Sarcoptic mange is a skin infection in mammals that is caused by a burrowing parasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. Wombat burrows are believed to have good conditions for the survival of mites and the transfer of mites between wombats.

Signs of mange infection include itching, scratching, skin thickening and crusting, loss of hair and body condition. Mange infections usually present as crusty skin lesions on the sides and legs of wombats. Scabs can also form around the eyes and ears, impacting on the animal’s sight and hearing.

Wombats were previously a common species in Narawntapu National Park. Although mange has been present in the park for decades, there was an outbreak of mange in 2006 following a severe drought. Since then mange has resulted in a substantial reduction in wombat numbers.

To learn more about mange and what is being done to help the wombat, see the DPIPWE page on mange.