Our Latest News

Exciting new proposal for Tasmania's South East Cape

16/10/2017

Award-winning local tourism operator Ian Johnstone can now progress a new project to lease and licence negotiations under the Tourism Opportunities in Tasmania's National Parks, Reserves and Crown Land process.More

Wineglass Bay track upgrade complete

16/10/2017

One of Tasmania's most iconic tourism experiences, the walk to Wineglass Bay from the lookout to the beach, has now re-opened after a $500,000 upgrade initiated through the Government's Tourism Infrastructure in Parks fund.
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Tourism opportunity for Tasman Island

12/10/2017

Tourists could soon enjoy the beautiful Tasman National Park from the air, as a change to the management plan could open it up for sensitive and appropriate aircraft access.More

Wombat Mange

The population of wombats in the area west of the Tamar River and in Narawntapu National Park reduced markedly between 2010 and 2016. The cause of this decline has been attributed to a severe outbreak of mange.

Sarcoptic mange is a skin infection in mammals that is caused by a burrowing parasitic mite, Sarcoptes scabiei. Wombat burrows are believed to have good conditions for the survival of mites and the transfer of mites between wombats.

Signs of mange infection include itching, scratching, skin thickening and crusting, loss of hair and body condition. Mange infections usually present as crusty skin lesions on the sides and legs of wombats. Scabs can also form around the eyes and ears, impacting on the animal’s sight and hearing.

Wombats were previously a common species in Narawntapu National Park. Although mange has been present in the park for decades, there was an outbreak of mange in 2006 following a severe drought. Since then mange has resulted in a substantial reduction in wombat numbers.

To learn more about mange and what is being done to help the wombat, see the DPIPWE page on mange.