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100 years on, Old Pelion Hut retains its charm

19/09/2017

One of Tasmania's favourite historic mountain huts, Old Pelion Hut in the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, is celebrating its centenary this year.More

Future-proofing our tourism icons

18/09/2017

Environment and Parks Minister Matthew Groom has announced that $8 million will be allocated to upgrade vital infrastructure in our parks and reserves over the next two years.More

Tenders advertised for Freycinet Master Plan

28/08/2017

Freycinet is one of the absolute jewels in Tasmania's crown, with locals and visitors flocking to the area in droves to experience one of the world's most stunning areas.
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Brydes Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Bryde’s Whales (pronounced broodus) reach up to 15m in females. They are the second smallest of the baleen whales. They were often confused with Sei Whales but can be easily distinguished by the three longitudinal ridges that run along the rostrum (from tip of snout to blowhole). A quarter of the body is made up of the head which features about 250-400 coarse grey baleen plates. They are generally dark grey to blue black above and lighter cream grey below. The dark grey extends to include the flippers and throat grooves. Unlike the Sei Whale these throat grooves extend beyond the navel. They have an erect, curved pointed dorsal fin located far down their back and unlike the tail fluke is exposed when surfacing. The tall dorsal fin rises abruptly from the back compared to that of Sei or Fin whales. Bryde’s Whales generally appear individually or as pairs and may moan when on the surface. They are voracious feeders and often seen in the vicinity of high fish abundance with flocks of birds and other marine predators. Like Minke Whales they will often approach vessels.

General Information

Bryde’s Whales occur in temperate to tropical waters both oceanic and inshore. South Africa has some resident inshore populations but most whales do appear to migrate to more tropical areas during winter following pelagic fish populations. There appears to be two forms of this whale, one being smaller and not reaching more than 12m in length and living closer inshore. They can reach up to 50 years in age. Newborns are around 3.4m in length and are generally born in winter in the migratory group. They feed on schooling fish such as anchovy and mackeral.

Stranding Information

Sightings of Bryde’s Whales have been reported from most Australian states as well as around a dozen strandings with most from New South Wales and only two from Tasmania, the most recent in Jaanuary 2013 at Ralphs Bay. Pollution, especially plastic debris is considered a threat to these whales. An 8m whale washed up in Queensland with close to 6 square meters of plastic in its stomach. Collisions are another threat with a Bryde's Whale colliding with a vessel off northern Tasmania. Of the 38 strandings of Bryde’s Whales in northern New Zealand over 20 years, 13 were calves that had collided with vessels. Bryde’s are the most common baleen whale in New Zealand. Climate change may impact on their distribution