Our Latest News

Campfire restrictions extended due to increasing fire risk

19/01/2018

In the interests of public safety, the Parks and Wildlife Service (PWS) has brought in extensive campfire restrictions as the fire risk continues to increase this summer.More

Improved toilet facilities at Bruny Island

16/01/2018

The Parks and Wildlife Service has completed work on a new toilet facility at the Bruny Island Neck Game Reserve.More

Further upgrade to South Coast Track

05/01/2018

The South Coast Track is one of Tasmania's great bushwalks, and the completion of recent upgrades has significantly improved the user experience along the track before the start of the peak walking season.More

Dense-beaked Whale

Drawing by Graham Sanders
Blainsvilles or the Dense-beaked Whale is generally grey-brown above and lighter underneath. Adults have a darker dorsal fin and large spots all over the body. In the female the beak is very white. The lower jaw is quite arched and has a prominent tooth in the males that can be encrusted with barnacles. This makes them look like they have two dark pompoms on the head making males easily identified at sea.

General Information

Males can reach up to 6m in length with females slightly
Distribution map of sightings and strandings (click to enlarge)
smaller and have a maximum weight of 1 tonne. Newborns are less than 2m. They are mature at about 4.5m when they are around ten years of age. Mostly they occur in groups of 3-7. On surfacing they will extend their beak and sometimes slap it in the water. They are more likely to approach vessels than other beaked whales.

Stranding Information

Only a few strandings of Dense-beaked Whales have been recorded from Australia with Queensland having seven and most states having at least one recording. Tasmania to date (2013) has had two, including one male animal at Marrawah. More strandings occur in South Africa. They seem to prefer tropical waters and are circumglobal - making them the most widely distributed of the beaked whales. They are seen more often than other beaked whales closer to the coast.