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Celebrating the achievements of landcarers

04/12/2017

The Tamar Island Wetland Cares Volunteer Group has been recognised in the 2017 Landcare Tasmania Awards.More

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Pandani Grove

17. Pandani Grove

time 30- 40 minute circuit (1.5km circuit)
access
From New Norfolk take road B62 and then B61.  If travelling from Lake St Clair, take road B61 from the Lyell Highway (A10), just east of Gretna. Once at the park, continue up the Lake Dobson Road for 16km. This section of road is unsealed and can be closed due to snow. See map
fees Park entry fees apply.
facilities Toilets and day shelter near walk start at Lake Dobson. Electric barbecues, visitor centre and restaurant located at the park entrance.
grade Level 2. The track has no steep sections, but ice and snow can cover sections of track.
what to take Group A items
cautions Supervise children , tracks subject to severe weather conditions all year round, weather may change quickly, tracks are difficult to navigate when covered in snow and may be impassable
prohibited No pets, firearms or bicycles

Named after the world's tallest heath - the pandani - this walk circuits Lake Dobson in the Mt Field National Park. In fine weather, it’s suitable for all the family.

Highlights

The remarkable pandani is just one of many subalpine plants that are found in Tasmania and nowhere else on Earth. Along the walk you will encounter numerous alpine plants. Indeed, Mt Field is unusual in that the diversity of plants in the upper reaches of the mountain is greater than the diversity of plants in the forests at the base of the mountain. 

At the far end of the lake, you will enter a stunning patch of forest dominated by a mixture of pandanis and pencil pines. Pencil pines are one of a number of ancient conifers that are endemic to Tasmania.

Platypuses are occasionally seen in Lake Dobson, particularly at dusk and dawn.