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Celebrating the achievements of landcarers

04/12/2017

The Tamar Island Wetland Cares Volunteer Group has been recognised in the 2017 Landcare Tasmania Awards.More

Horsetail Falls walk now open

15/11/2017

Visitors to the West Coast are in for some spectacular views on the new Horsetail Falls walk near Queenstown.More

Bruny Island Neck lookout re-opens

10/11/2017

The walkways and lookout at the Bruny Island Neck will re-open to the public today, following the completion of a new, larger car park that will provide improved access to the popular lookout.More

Organ Pipes, Mt Wellington

1. Organ Pipes Walk, Mt Wellington

time 3 hours return (3.7km one way)
access Davey Street and Huon Road from Hobart to Fern Tree, then the Pinnacle Road to the Springs (13km from Hobart). Alternatively, catch the public bus service from Franklin Square in Hobart to Fern Tree and then take a 40-50 minute uphill walk to the Springs by walking track. Walk starts on the Pinnacle Track, across the road from the Springs toilet block. A small track leads to the top of a loop road where the Pinnacle Track begins. See map.
facilities Toilets, drinking water, day shelters and fireplaces located at the Springs and Fern Tree. Day shelter huts along the track.
grade Level 3. Walk includes 400m climb over1.8km distance and is rocky in sections.
what to take Group B items
cautions Supervise children , tracks subject to severe weather conditions all year round, weather may change quickly, tracks are difficult to navigate when covered in snow and may be impassable
prohibited Biycles are not permitted on this walk. Dogs are permitted on a section of this walk, but not the entire walk, and must be kept on a leash. (Map at track start has further details).

Beautiful Mt Wellington has a range of walking tracks. This walk leaves from the Springs and takes walkers beneath the fluted columns known as the Organ Pipes.

Highlights

The Organ Pipes are one of the most distinctive features on Mt Wellington, and form a magnificent sight along this track which runs just below their base. The dolerite rock that comprises the towering, columnar  cliffs was formed during the Jurassic when Tasmania was in the process of separating from Antarctica during the final stages of the breakup of Gondwana. The cliffs are a favourite haunt of rock climbers.

Mt Wellington is managed by the Wellington Park Management Trust.